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Inequality before Birth Contributes to Health Inequality in Adults

Inequality before Birth Contributes to Health Inequality in Adults

Janet Currie

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately hurt members of minority communities in the U.S. As of late July, 73.7 Black people out of every 100,000 had died of the coronavirus—compared with 32.4 of every 100,000 white people. Structural racism accounts for much of this disparity. African-Americans are more likely to have jobs that require them to leave their homes and to commute by transport, for example, of which increase the chances of getting . They are also more likely to get grievously ill when the virus strikes. As of early June, the hospitalization rate for those who positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection was more than times higher for Black people than for non-Hispanic white people.


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Author: Janet Currie {authorlink}
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