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Pakistan bans TikTok over ‘immoral and indecent’ content

Pakistan bans TikTok over ‘immoral and indecent’ content

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The TikTok logo is pictured outside the company's U.S. head office in Culver City, California, U.S.,  September 15, 2020.   REUTERS/Mike Blake


Mike Blake / reuters

TikTok may have received a temporary reprieve from its ban by the Trump administration recently, but the app is struggling to keep its in other countries. Following a recent ban in India, TikTok has been blocked in Pakistan as well. In a press release issued today, the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA) cited “complaints from different segments of the society” and “the nature of the content being consistently posted on TIkTok.”

The PTA noted that it had issued a final notice to the app to today’s announcement, and provided “considerable time to respond and comply with the Authority instructions for development of effective mechanism for proactive moderation of unlawful online content.” TikTok had “failed to fully comply with the instructions,” the PTA said, resulting in the ban.

The PTA also said it is “open for engagement and will review his decision subject to a satisfactory mechanism by TikTok to moderate unlawful content.” On Twitter, the PTA’s statement received mixed reactions, with the majority of replies lauding the decision while criticized the department.

In March, the Pakistan government issued a notification through its Citizen Protection (Against Online Harm) Rules that require social media companies to “take due cognizance of the religious, cultural, ethnic and national security sensitivities of Pakistan.”

According to Nikkei, TikTok said it was “committed to following the law in markets where the app is offered” and that it’s regularly communicating with the PTA and continuing to work with them. “We are hopeful to reach a conclusion that helps us continue to serve the country’s vibrant and creative online community,” the company added.

In this article:

tiktok, apps, social media, pakistan, ban, news, gear
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