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Moving in Sync Creates Surprising Social Bonds among People

Moving in Sync Creates Surprising Social Bonds among People

Marta Zaraska

To save any of his marching bandmates, Steve Marx says, he would run into onrushing traffic no hesitation. It’s kind of language often heard former army buddies, not musicians, but Marx brings up the scenario to show the strength of his feelings about this group. The marching band director at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania has been participating in musical ensembles for more than 20 years, since he was in high school, and says that “the sort of bonding that you form extremely strong. It’s like a family.” Everyone is in uniforms, musical instruments in hands, marching forward in perfect harmony, left leg, right leg, movements and sounds so synchronized that individuals blur into the greater group. The allure is not even that much about , he admits. Marching, for him, is mostly about the sense of kinship.


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Author: Marta Zaraska {authorlink}
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